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Sources » Sources » December 2, 2016 10:04 am

LauraM
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If there are future editions of Roberts, in my opinion it would be best to have the year of the edition. Roberts, 2020, p5  or if there are multiple works by Bury, you need the title keyword and the volume number.

The Duchess of Teck » DoT-3 The Duchess of Teck's Tiara » November 7, 2016 8:51 am

LauraM
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3.  The Duchess of Teck's Tiara

   Photographic evidence of Queen Elizabeth wearing the Duchess of Teck's tiara at an event sometime after World War II has emerged thanks to poster Beth at Royal Jewels of the World Message Board. An insightful series of pictures shows how the wearing of the tiara has evolved according to fashion and to the taste of the wearers.

bodice ornaments » QEII-13 The Queen’s New Zealand Silver-Fern Brooch » October 30, 2016 5:40 am

LauraM
Replies: 2

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11. The Queen’s New Zealand Silver-Fern Brooch

   The brooch was reported to have cost £600 sterling. [1]


1. Charles Madden, "Queen Delighted by NZ Santa Claus," The Advertiser (Adelaide) 26 Dec 1953, p 2

bodice ornaments » QEII-91 The Queen’s Diamond and Amethyst Thistle Brooch » October 18, 2016 4:53 am

LauraM
Replies: 2

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91. The Queen's Diamond and Amethyst Thistle Brooch

   The Queen has had this brooch since 1952, when she was pictured wearing it on 26 Sep 1952 at Balmoral during a visit by King Faisal of Egypt.[1] It was also worn by the Queen in Paisley and Edinburgh on 24 Jun 1953 as she began her Scottish tour shortly after her coronation.[2]

   The brooch also appears to have emeralds incorporated in the middle of the ribbon element.

1. Queen Elizabeth II and The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, with their children, Prince Charles and Princess Anne, entertaining their guests, King Faisal II of Iraq and the Regent of Iraq (left) in the grounds of Balmoral Castle, Scotland Getty Images Accessed 17 Oct 2016 Archive Entertainment On Wire Image: Hulton Royals Collection
2. Reed, Freddie. Freddie Reed's Royal Tours: 50 Years of Royal Photographs London: David & Charles, 1989. p 41

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-85 Queen Mary’s Enamel Maple-Leaf Spray Brooch » September 11, 2016 8:21 am

LauraM
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TBF-QM-85 Queen Mary's Enamel Maple-Leaf Spray Brooch

   The following excerpt is taken from "The Tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York through the dominion of Canada in the year 1901." Joseph Pope, C.M.G. Under Secretary of State

   Shortly after dinner on Wednesday, a simple ceremony took place at Lord Strathcona's residence, being the presentation to their Royal Highnesses of mementos of their visit to Montreal, by the members of the Citizens' Reception Committee. That to the Duchess, which was presented by Lady Strathcona and Mrs. Drummond, consisted of a spray of maple leaves wrought in gold and enamel and set with diamonds and pearls. An album of Canadian views accompanied this gift, and a richly illuminated address which read:

To Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Cornwall and York.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR ROYAL HIGHNESS:

As a souvenir of your visit to this city the members of the Citizens' Reception Committee respectfully ask your gracious acceptance of this jewel, which reproduces in its autumnal tints the maple leaf. With it are two volumes of Canadian photographs. They desire loyally to tender to your Royal Highness an expression of hope for a prosperous accomplishment of your long journeyings and a happy reunion with your children.[1]

1. Pope C.M.G., Joseph. The Tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York through the dominion of Canada in the year 1901." Ottawa: S.E.Dawson The King's Printer, 1903, p. 32

head ornaments » TBF-QM-58 Queen Mary’s Empress Marie Feodorovna Sapphire Bandeau » August 20, 2016 11:50 am

LauraM
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58. Queen Mary's Empress Marie Feodorovna Sapphire Bandeau

   The valuations prepared by the senior partner at Hennells, Mr Hardy, of the 76 jewels from the late Dowager Empress's jewel casket, does not list this small sapphire and diamond tiara.[1] However, Queen Mary could have purchased it privately from Grand Duchess Xenia and Grand Duchess Olga.

  The valuations show that Queen Mary bought four pieces of jewellery: "a pearl and diamond collar with sapphire and diamond clasp", "a pearl and diamond twist brooch", "a cabochon sapphire and rose diamond long brooch", and "an oval cabochon sapphire and diamond oval cluster brooch".[2]

1. William Clarke. "How the Dowager Empress's Jewels Survived a Revolution". Kejeserinde Dagmar Empress of Russia: An exhibition about the Danish princess who became Empress of Russia. (Copenhagen: Christiansborg Palace, 1997) pp. 344-351
2. Ibid., p. 342

bodice ornaments » QEII-100 The Perth Bridge Opening Brooch » August 20, 2016 9:58 am

LauraM
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100. The Perth Bridge Opening Brooch

   Due to the lack of an image for this brooch, it has been confused with TBF-QEII-78 The Queen's Amethyst Bouquet Brooch which contains seven large amethysts and diamonds, which does not match the description given in Field quoted above.

   Poster Franck in a message at the Royal Jewels of the World Message Board posted on 11 Nov 2013 shared his discovery of news footage which showed the brooch. Much discussion ensued at the Board.

  It appears that the Queen wore the Perth Bridge Opening brooch at the Windsor Horse Show in 1995.
 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-56 Queen Mary’s Empress Marie Feodorovna Brooch » August 19, 2016 11:02 pm

LauraM
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56. Queen Mary's Empress Marie Feodorovna Brooch

   In 1997, Queen Elizabeth II lent this brooch to an exhibition about the Dowager Empress Marie at the Christiansborg Palace.[1]

   The following information is taken verbatim from page 336 of the exhibition catalogue cited below.

   "Brooch with a cabochon sapphire (18.2 x 15.3 x 7.8 mm, c. 21 carats) center, a two-row border of old-cut diamonds mounted in yellow gold and silver cut-down settings; a large pear-shaped pearl drop (17.8 x 10.5 mm) set to a rose-diamond cap and attached to the brooch by an old-cut diamond single stone collet (detachable).

   The brooch was a wedding present in 1866 to Maria Feodorovna from her brother-in-law and sister, the Prince and Princess of Wales. The brooch can be seen on Maria Feodorovna's bodice on a hand-coloured photograph, dated 1903, and now in the Officers' Foundation of the Royal Life Guards (Denmark) (Cat. no. 145).

   The brooch was one of the jewels that the Dowager Empress brought with her in exile from the Crimea to England and Denmark. Shortly after her death on Oct. 13, 1928, her jewel case was taken to England via the British Legation in Copenhagen through the auspices of George V, and on May 29, 1929, A. W. Hardy, senior partner at R. G. Hennell & Sons, appraised the 76 jewels in the case at Windsor Castle.

   Hardy's preliminary valuation of the sapphire brooch, no. 42 on the list was £3,250, while the final value on June 11, 1929, was £2,700-3,240; the list notes that the pearl was "broken." After the stock market crash on Wall Street, the appraisal was set on Sept. 22, 1930, at £1,400-1,900.

   On Oct. 3, 1930, the brooch was sold for £2,375 to Queen Mary, and sent by messenger to Buckingham Palace.

   The brooch bears no marks. It has never before been exhibited.

   Lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II."

1. William Clarke. "How the Dowager Empress's Jewels Survived a Revolution". Kejeserinde Dagmar Empress of Ru

neck ornaments » TBF-QM-57 Queen Mary’s Empress Marie Feodorovna Collar » August 19, 2016 10:45 pm

LauraM
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57. Queen Mary's Empress Marie Feodorovna Collar

   This collar was amongst 76 items of jewellery consigned to Hennells, the Bond Street jewelers, by Grand Duchesses Xenia and Olga for sale.[1] The items were provisionally valued at £144,000 by Mr Hardy of Hennells.[2] "Subsequently he submitted a revised written valuation of £159,000. The amount of money finally raised by Hennells was £136,624. In retrospect, the jewelers did as well as could be expected, since the Great Stock Market Crash of 1929 began just five months after the valuation had been made and led to a dramatic drop in the price of jewels, especially pearls."[3]

   Hennells's valuations show that Queen Mary bought four items from the Dowager Empress's collection. The collar, bought at the beginning of the sale "...was item No. 7, "a pearl and diamond collar with sapphire and diamond clasp,".[4] It "was valued at between £5,678 and £6,000; Queen Mary paid £6,000."[5]

1. William Clarke. "How the Dowager Empress's Jewels Survived a Revolution". Kejeserinde Dagmar Empress of Russia: An exhibition about the Danish princess who became Empress of Russia. (Copenhagen: Christiansborg Palace, 1997) p. 338
2. Ibid., p. 340
3. Ibid., pp. 340-342
4. Ibid., p. 342
5. Ibid.
 

bodice ornaments » QEII-78 The Queen’s Amethyst Bouquet Brooch » August 19, 2016 12:04 pm

LauraM
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78. The Queen's Amethyst Bouquet Brooch

   The brooch described by Field is correctly known as the Perth Bridge Opening Brooch. The Amethyst Bouquet brooch consists of seven amethysts forming the centers of flowers set in diamonds which does not match the description of the Perth Bridge brooch provided by Field.

   The origin of the Amethyst Bouquet Brooch is unknown. The Queen frequently wears this brooch.



  

bodice ornaments » QEII-53 The Queen’s Coral Rose Brooch » August 19, 2016 11:18 am

LauraM
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53. The Queen's Coral Rose Brooch

   In a 13 May 2012 blog posting "From Her Majesty's Jewel Vault", the blogger Order of Splendor states that the brooch was the gift of the Order of the Liberation (France). It was given  in 1990 to mark the 50th anniversary of June 18, 1940.[1]

1. "The Coral Rose Brooch", From Her Majesty's Jewel Vault, 13 May 2012. (Accessed 18 Aug 2016). http://queensjewelvault.blogspot.ca/2012/05/the-coral-rose-brooch.html

Your Topics » Queen Victoria’s Garter Bar Brooch » August 19, 2016 9:18 am

LauraM
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   Queen Victoria's Garter Bow Brooch is item 39. Queen Victoria's Garter Bow Brooch in Boffer's files. However, he did post the following on Royal Jewels of the World Message Board.

Re: Bar Brooches Archived Message
Posted by Boffer on January 15, 2012, 6:53 am, in reply to "Bar Brooches"
90.209.235.152
The shorter Bar Brooch of 10 stones was made by Rundell, Bridge & Co in 1838 for Queen Victoria.

What is of note about this brooch is that it is not considered a piece of jewellery.

In the 2010 exhibition on Victoria & Albert: Art & Love, and the accompanying literature by Marsden, this brooch was included in the "insignia" section. And it is now firmly regarded as part of the Garter insignia, and not necessary as a brooch or piece of jewellery.

This 10 stone Bar Brooch was originally made as two separate bars, to be worn to fix the sash at the front and back of the shoulder, however they were later remodelled in Queen Victoria's lifetime, to form one single brooch.

This brooch was used by Queen Alexandra as part of her Garter insignia, and then by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, who used it as part of her Garter insignia and retained use of it until her death in 2002.

The 14 stones Bar Brooch, first appeared on Queen Mary, and it is likely that this was commissioned when she was created as a Lady of the Garter as part of her insignia, to attach the sash at the top of her shoulder, as Queen Victoria's brooch was retained by Queen Alexandra.

The 14 stone Bar Brooch then passed to the Queen, who used it as part of her insignia too, often wearing it at the back of the sash, so not visible from the front.

Since 2002, the Queen has had access to both the 10 stone Bar Brooch and the 14 Stone Bar Brooch, although it is not clear which one she wears as she is rarely photographed from behind.
HM also wears the Prince Albert Sapphire Brooch to attach her G

Queen Alexandra » TBF-QA-3 Queen Alexandra's Collier Résille » July 10, 2016 11:56 am

LauraM
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3. Queen Alexandra's Collier Résille

    Shirley Bury wrote about this necklace that "It was entirely consistent with the Queen's independent attitude that she should also patronize Lalique and then resort to another Parisian jeweller, Pierre Cartier, in 1904 to make her a diamond résille (literally, hairnet) dog-collar front with a fall in the Louis Seize manner. Set with diamonds, emeralds and rubies broken out of an Indian necklace, it cost the Queen 6,600 francs. The shimmering effect of this constellation of stones perched on knife-edge settings is admirably caught in François Flameng's portrait.[1] Suzy Menkes reproduced the page in the Cartier ledger which details the order.[2]

   The necklace was worn by Queen Mary with and without the removable fringe. This necklace is often confused with a second collier resille which has bows and swags in the Garland style which was the property of Queen Alexandra.

1. Shirley Bury. Jewellery - The International Era 1789-1910 volume 2, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors' Club, 1997; Margaret Young-Sanchez et al. Cartier in the 20th Century. New York: Vendome Press, 2014 p.31
2. Suzy Menkes. The Royal Jewels, London: Grafton Books, 1985.

bodice ornaments » QEII-9 The Queen’s Williamson Pink Diamond Brooch » July 10, 2016 1:11 am

LauraM
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9. The Queen's Williamson Pink Diamond

   "In shape the diamond was a cleavage, almost circular in its widest part and rounded over the top but tapered in its short conical lower half."[1] Prolonged study of the stone was required before deciding how to cut it. "But its shape presented a special problem because in the lower half of the diamond there was a deep cavity, equal in size to 3 carats. It was thought that the cutting needed to remove all trace of this pit would be such that the final polished gem could not possibly weigh more than 18 carats. Some experts in fact doubted whether the eventual yield would exceed 14 carats."[2]
 
   It is a tribute to the expertise of Mr Briefel that he came up with the method that permitted the diamond's maximum diameter to be maintained and the cavity was first reduced to a blemish on one of the facets, which was the state of the stone when Princess Elizabeth, accompanied by Queen Mary, visited the factory on 10 March 1948.[3] By the end of March, all trace of the cavity was gone. On 14 Apr 1948, the Princess' private secretary was informed that the brilliant had reached its final weight of 23.6 carats and retained the pink colour that it showed in the rough. It was completely pure and flawless.[4]
 
   The setting of the Williamson Pink in the Cartier jonquil brooch was complimented by the white diamonds which also came from the mine at Mwandi, which is where the pink diamond rough was found.[5] The brooch has 21 marquises with a total weight of 9.73 carats, 12 baguettes with a total weight of 4.64 carats and 170 brilliants with a total weight of 12.40 carats.[6]

   "The brooch was made of platinum and measured 114.3 mm long."[7] It was displayed at "The Ageless Diamond" exhibition in London in 1959.[8]
 
1. Balfour, Ian. Famous Diamonds, 5th edition. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors Club, 2009. p. 292
2. Ibid., p. 292
3. Ibid.
4. Ibid. p. 292-293
5. Ibid., p. 293
6. Ibid.
7. Ibid.
8. Ibid.

rings » TBF-QM-37 The Cullinan IX Ring » July 10, 2016 12:58 am

LauraM
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37. The Cullinan IX Ring
 
  "With the Cullinan diamond pendants, the Queen was presented with a ring, also cut from the great stone. The ring, together with the pendants, was mounted in platinum in designs approved by her Majesty by the same jewellers [Carrington & Co.]."[1]
 
   This reference was discovered by Beth at the Royal Jewels of the World Message Board.
 
1. "The Cullinan Diamond Ring Presented to the Queen." The Illustrated London News, 9 Jul 1910, 48 
 

neck ornaments » TBF-QM-38 The Cullinan Necklace » July 10, 2016 12:56 am

LauraM
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38. The Cullinan Necklace
 
   It has been assumed that Queen Mary received all the "cleavings" or "chippings" from the Cullinan. Ian Balfour in his book Famous Diamonds (5th edition) has written otherwise.

   "One of the 96 small brilliants cut from the Cullinan was exhibited in London in June 1932. It was named the 'Romyn' after Jacob Romijn (later Romyn) who had worked in Amsterdam, first as a cleaver then as a diamond broker; in the latter capacity he came into contact with many of the leading firms including Messrs I. J. Asscher. Jacob Romijn was one of the joint founders of the first trade union in the diamond industry. Subsequently, he became involved in the diamond industry in South Africa as well as in that country's political situation in which he had dealings with General Louis Botha."[1]
 
   "Later two others, a marquise weighing 2.5 carats and a brilliant weighing 1.5 carats, were displayed at the exhibition 'The Jewel Box 1966' arranged in Johannesburg by De Beers to commemorate the centenary of the discovery of diamonds in South Africa. They had been a gift to General Botha. Presumably the General must also have received a third gem because in April 1977 a marquise weighing 1.58 carats, mounted in a plain gold ring, which he had presented to his daughter Helena, the late Mrs de Waal, on her seventeenth birthday, was auctioned in Johannesburg. Known as the De Waal diamond,  it was bought by a Johannesburg jeweller for 25,000 rand--more than three times the estimated price. An official of the De Beers diamond laboratory was able to examine the stone and described it as being 'without a shadow of doubt the purest form of diamond I have ever encountered'."[2]
 
   At the time of writing no primary sources have been discovered as to how the "chippings" were used by Queen Mary.
 
1. Balfour, Ian. Famous Diamonds, 5th edition. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors Club, 2009,  p. 75
2. Ibid.
 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-36 The Cullinan VI and VIII Brooch » July 10, 2016 12:45 am

LauraM
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36. The Cullinan VI and VIII Brooch
 
  
Contrary to the assertion of Roberts, this brooch was not made by Garrard; it was mounted by Carrington & Co., Crown Jewellers[1] as part of the second pendant presented to Queen Mary by Sir Richard Solomon, the South African High Commissioner in London. [2]
 
      This pendant consisted of the emerald-cut Cullinan VIII as the top-most element attached to the Cullinan V in its setting as the centre, with the marquise Cullinan VII suspended as a drop, as seen in The Illustrated London News.[3] The settings were platinum. Queen Mary  is pictured wearing this brooch in its original design as a corsage brooch in an exclusive Illustrated London News photograph showing Queen Mary wearing her Garter insignia.[4] This new information came to light courtesy of Beth at the Royal Jewels of the World Message Boardand the subsequent discussion sparked by this research.
 
   As Boffer has noted, the Cullinan VII was worn as a pendant on the 'Delhi Durbar Emerald necklace' or attached directly to Cullinan V or Cullinan VIII.
 
1. "The Smaller Cullinan Pendant." The Illustrated London News, 9 Jul 1910, 48 
2. "South Africa and the Queen. Gift of Crown Jewels." The Times 29 Jun 1910, 13
3. "The Smaller Cullinan Pendant." The Illustrated London News, 9 Jul 1910, 48 
4. "The Queen as Lady of the Garter: An Exclusive Photograph. Published for the First Time in The Illustrated London News", The Illustrated London News, 20 May 1911, 721
 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-35 The Cullinan V Brooch » July 10, 2016 12:43 am

LauraM
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35. The Cullinan V Brooch
 
   Contrary to the assertion of Roberts, this brooch was not made by Garrard; it was mounted by Carrington & Co., Crown Jewellers[1] as the central element of the second pendant presented to Queen Mary by Sir Richard Solomon, the South African High Commissioner in London. [2]
 
   This pendant consisted of the emerald-cut Cullinan VIII as the top-most element attached to the Cullinan V in its setting as the centre, with the marquise Cullinan VII suspended as a drop, as seen in The Illustrated London News.[3] The settings were platinum. Queen Mary  is pictured wearing this brooch in its original design as a corsage brooch in an exclusive Illustrated London News photograph showing Queen Mary wearing her Garter insignia.[4]
 
   This new information came to light courtesy of Beth at the Royal Jewels of the World Message Board and the subsequent discussion sparked by this research.
 
1. "The Smaller Cullinan Pendant." The Illustrated London News, 9 Jul 1910, p. 48 
2. "South Africa and the Queen. Gift of Crown Jewels." The Times 29 Jun 1910, p. 13
3. "The Smaller Cullinan Pendant." The Illustrated London News, 9 Jul 1910, p. 48 
4. "The Queen as Lady of the Garter: An Exclusive Photograph. Published for the First Time in The Illustrated London News", The Illustrated London News, 20 May 1911, p. 721
 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-34 The Cullinan III and IV Brooch » July 10, 2016 12:25 am

LauraM
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34. The Cullinan III and IV Brooch
 
   Ian Balfour, author of Famous Diamonds, has clarified the situation concerning what constituted the Cullinan 'chippings'. He wrote: "By arrangement, the 'chippings' from the Cullinan were retained by Messrs Asscher in remuneration for their services, and a small part presented to Mr (later Sir) Arthur Levy and Mr Alexander Levy, who had acted as expert supervisors of the operation in Amsterdam. The 'chippings' constituted the whole product of the Cullinan except for the two principal stones. The King immediately bought Cullinan VI as a present for Queen Alexandra; it is now a drop pendant in an emerald and diamond necklace owned by Queen Elizabeth II. The other six large gems, 96 small brilliants and a quantity of unpolished fragments weighing about 19.5 carats were bought by the Transvaal government in 1910, again on the insistence of General Botha and on the suggestion of Messrs Levy and Nephews, who feared that they might pass into private ownership."[1]
 
   However, not all of the 'chippings' were given to Queen Mary. "One of the 96 small brilliants cut from the Cullinan was exhibited in London in June 1932. It was named the 'Romyn' after Jacob Romijn (later Romyn) who had worked in Amsterdam, first as a cleaver then as a diamond broker; in the latter capacity he came into contact with many of the leading firms including Messrs I. J. Asscher. Jacob Romijn was one of the joint founders of the first trade union in the diamond industry. Subsequently, he became involved in the diamond industry in South Africa as well as in that country's political situation in which he had dealings with General Louis Botha."[2]
 
   "Later two others, a marquise weighing 2.5 carats and a brilliant weighing 1.5 carats, were displayed at the exhibition 'The Jewel Box 1966' arranged in Johannesburg by De Beers to commemorate the centenary of the discovery of diamonds in South Africa. They had been a gift to General Botha.

neck ornaments » TBF-QEII-8 The Queen’s Nizam of Hyderabad Necklace » June 9, 2016 5:58 am

LauraM
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The Queen's Nizam of Hyderabad Necklace

   The Queen lent this necklace to the Duchess of Cambridge who wore it to an evening event at the National Portrait Gallery on 11 February 2014.[1]

1. Rebecca English. "Kate Middleton adds sparkle". Daily Mail, 12 Feb 2014 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2557090/Kate-Middleton-adds-sparkle-Portrait-Gallery-fundraiser-diamond-necklace.html)

parures » TBF-QEII-38 The Queen’s Brazilian Aquamarine Parure » June 9, 2016 5:43 am

LauraM
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38. The Queen's Brazilian Aquamarine Parure
 
   There were 647 diamonds and 11 aquamarines used in the 1953 aquamarine and diamond necklace and earrings. Their settings were platinum.[1] The value of the gift was reportedly $50,000 (USD)[2] and, according to some contemporary news reports, the funds for purchasing it came from individuals rather than the Brazilian government[3]. However, the Royal Collection refers to this gift as being from the Government and people of Brazil[4]. One of the first occasions to which the Queen wore the necklace and earrings was to the performance of Rimsky-Korsakov's Le Coq d'Or at the Royal Opera House during 1954 State Visit of The King and Queen of Sweden.[5] She also wore the necklace and earrings to the Royal Variety Performance in the same year.[6]
 
   The simple bandeau tiara commissioned by the Queen was worn with the Brazilian Coronation gift to the Royal Film Performance, Odeon Theatre in Leicester Square, London in 1957.[7] (With much thanks to Beth for her additional research, notes 1 - 7)

   In 1968, the Queen received a "V-shaped aquamarine hair ornament" which was supposedly dismantled in 1971 used to make "four scroll-shaped motifs" for the Queen's tiara. In 1970, the Queen wore a tiara with five aquamarine and diamond motifs during her Canadian tour. It is unclear whether the hair ornament was the 1968 gift worn as a tiara in Canada in 1970.

   Much to the surprise of royal jewellery watchers, the Countess of Wessex appeared at the Luxembourg pre-wedding gala in October 2012 wearing the tiara that the Queen was pictured wearing in Canada in 1970. Much remains uncertain about the design evolution of this parure. Its reappearance sparked much discussion at the Royal Jewels of the World Message Board.

  Nellie has suggested the

parures » TBF-QEII-37 The Queen’s Andamooka Opal Suite » June 9, 2016 5:37 am

LauraM
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37. The Queen's Andamooka Opal Suite

   The Andamooka opal is "... in a necklet set with 180 diamonds."[1] "The side pieces are hand carved in a scroll design set in diamonds. The chain at the back is of diamonds, each in a diamond-shaped setting, alternating with links pierced in a matching scroll design and finished with a diamond-set snap in diamonds."[2] The "opal and diamond earrings 1 3/4 in. long match the necklet"[3] as they were cut from the same stone.

   The rough stone weighed six ounces and the stones were cut and polished in Melbourne by gem cutter John Altmann, who was a partner in Altman and Cherney.[4] "The principal part of the necklet was made by Mr. M. Campbell of Wendts, Ltd....while the chain at the back of the necklet was made by Mr. Muller."[5]

   Prince Philip also received a gift of opals set as sleeve links. "These consist of four [white] opals mounted in 18 ct. white gold with heavy gold connections. The back of the setting of each opal is hand pierced, allowing light to penetrate from the back and giving a more brilliant appearance to the Opal."[6] These opals came from Coober Pedy.[7]

1. Famed Opal for Queen'. The Mercury, 24 Mar 1954, p.1
2. 'Queen's Opal Gift is Link with State.' The Advertiser (Adelaide) 24 Mar 1954, p. 2
3. 'Famed Opal for Queen'. The Mercury, 24 Mar 1954, p.1
4. 'Melbourne Man Cut Opal for Queen.' The Age (Melbourne) 25 Mar 1954 p. 1
5. "Worked Secretly on Queen's Gift for eight weeks" The Advertiser, Adelaide, 25 Mar 1954 p9
6. 'Opals for Queen." Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners Advocate, 25 Mar 1954 p. 5
7. 'Queen's Opal Gift is Link With State.' Chronicle (Adelaide) 25 Mar 1954 p. 4

bodice ornaments » QEII-44 The Queen’s BOAC Brooch » May 15, 2016 6:54 am

LauraM
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44. The Queen's BOAC Brooch

   Princess Elizabeth was the Master of the Guild of Airline Pilots at the time of the launching and the brooch was particularly appropriate to commemorate her first airplane launch.[1]

1. Princess Names Air Liner, Derby Daily Telegraph, 21 January 1947, p. 4

bodice ornaments » QEII-47 The Queen’s Carved Ruby Brooch » May 5, 2016 10:42 am

LauraM
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47. The Queen's Carved Ruby Brooch

  "This brooch formed part of a collection of jewellery which The Council of Industrial Design chose as a contender for the Duke of Edinburgh's Prize. Subsequently, [Andrew] Grima was the only jewellery designer to be awarded The Duke of Edinburgh Prize for Elegant Design, which was established in 1959 and given to a designer of 'a contemporary design in current production distinguished by its elegance'. Grima, who trained as an engineer, was subsequently awarded The Queen's Award for Industry and the Royal Warrant"[1] in 1966, the same year he opened his shop on Jerymn Street.[2]
 
   The brooch is approximately "...two inches wide, with brilliant-cut diamonds set in platinum and carved rubies set in [irregularly-carved] gold."[3] The rubies came from an Indian ornament.

    Andrew Grima made over 100 pieces of jewellery for the Royal Family, some of which were commissions for diplomatic gifts.[4] His jewels are owned by The Princess Royal and Princess Michael of Kent[5], while the late Princess Margaret had many of his unique pieces, such as the lichen brooch which was sold at the auction of her jewels.[6] He also designed the wedding gift for Crown Princess Margarethe given by the British Royal Family[7] and the starburst brooch given to Madame George Pompidou by Queen Elizabeth during the Queen's 1972 French state visit.[8] Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother also placed orders with him.[9] The late Princess of Wales is also said to have owned a Grima piece.
 
 1.  Carved Ruby, Gold and Diamond Brooch | Grima | Gift from the Duke of Edinburgh https://royal-magazin.de/england/queen/ruby-roh-grima-brooch-gift-present-duke.htm
2.
"Andrew Grima Biography" www.grimajewellery.com (accessed 04 Jul 2016); "Obituary" Andrew Grima" The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2008/jan/18/3
[size=100]3. Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth I

bodice ornaments » QEII-1 The Queen’s Rhodesian Flame Lily Brooch » May 5, 2016 10:16 am

LauraM
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1. The Queen's Rhodesian Flame Lily Brooch

   As has been noted, the Flame Lily Brooch is unique in that a version of it was owned by The Queen, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret. However all three brooches are not identical. The Queen's has 301 diamonds, the Queen Mother's 300 stones and Princess Margaret's has 299 diamonds.[1]

   Len Bell, the designer responsible for the brooch, had an established jewellery business in Rhodesia. His son, Brendon Bell, provided some additional information about the Flame Lily's creation in a newspaper interview.

   "Mr Bell's father's initial design of a white gold Zimbabwe bird was chosen, but hastily changed at the 11th hour when it was discovered the Girl Guides, whose emblem was the bird, was presenting her with a similar design. "My mother suggested he design a brooch from the flame lily (Gloriosa superba)," explained Mr Bell.

   "His father's pencil sketch was accepted and he created a brooch of white gold and 301 diamonds at a cost of £1,000."[2] In 2006, Mr Bell wrote to the Queen informing her of his father's role in the creation of the brooch. A response came from Buckingham Palace with an invitation for  Mr and Mrs Bell to see the brooch.[3]

   "I was only three when my father made it and can hardly remember the occasion. It was a wonderful privilege to be able to see it again and show her the signature she placed against the sketch my father made," said Mr Bell.[4]

1. Viv Mason, Couple's delight at winning back UK Citizenship. Craven Harold and Pioneer, 13 January 2007.
2. Ibid.
3. Ibid.
4. Ibid.

 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QEII-82 The Queen’s Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company Ruby Clip » April 27, 2016 12:56 am

LauraM
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82. The Queen's Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company Ruby Clip

  The Goldsmiths' Company is one of the 12 Great Livery Companies of the City of London. It was chartered in 1387 and is ranked fifth in precedence.[1]

1. History of the Company, The Goldsmiths' Company. [https://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/company/history/history-of-the-company/] Accessed 18 Aug 2016

 

bodice ornaments » TBF-QEII-87 The Queen’s Overseas League Galleon Brooch » April 26, 2016 7:26 am

LauraM
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87. The Queen's Overseas League Galleon Brooch

   The following news item appeared on 10 November 1947.

Overseas League wedding gift to Princess Elizabeth.
 
   The wedding gift of the Overseas League to Princess Elizabeth will be a jewelled clip fashioned in the form of the emblem of the League, the letters "O S" imposed on a galleon in full sail, together with a silver-gilt box on which it can be mounted when not worn. The wedding gift of the 58,000 members of the Overseas League is made from materials of Empire origin - diamonds and gold from South Africa; sapphires from Ceylon; rubies from Burma and platinum from Canada.
 

 

watches » TBF-QEII-96 The Queen’s Jaeger-LeCoultre Diamond Watch » April 24, 2016 11:03 am

LauraM
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96. The Queen's Jaeger-LeCoultre Diamond Watch

   "Marking The Queen's Diamond Jubilee, Swiss watch house Jaeger-LeCoultre presented Her Majesty with a diamond bracelet watch, very similar to the one she wore on her Coronation Day. Powered by the smallest mechanical watch movement in the world, the model is known as the "101".

   The white gold diamond watch was presented to The Queen by Jérôme Lambert CEO of Jaeger-LeCoultre. "The entire family of Jaeger-LeCoultre is particularly proud to see the 101 in the Royal Collection again," said Mr Lambert to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth as she marvelled at the piece and its minute proportions.

   The white gold watch is set with baguette diamonds and is powered by the smallest mechanical watch movement in the world, the JLC Calibre 101. First built in 1929, the Calibre 101 is so small that its 98 tiny parts only weigh one gram and its assembly is a specialised process that only three watchmakers in the Jaeger-LeCoultre manufacture can master.

   Unlike the watch The Queen wore on her Coronation Day, this model is in white gold and not yellow gold. The original was given to the Queen by the French President and its whereabouts are unknown."[1]

1. The Jewellery Editor, Queen receives diamond watch from Jaeger-LeCoultre http://www.thejewelleryeditor.com/watches/queen-receives-diamond-watch-from-jaeger-lecoultre/ (Accessed 23 April 2016)

bodice ornaments » TBF-QM-73 Queen Mary’s West Yorkshire Regiment Rose Brooch » April 13, 2016 6:20 am

LauraM
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73. Queen Mary's West Yorkshire Regiment Rose Brooch

   In the 2006 Christie's auction catalogue, the brooch was described as being "naturalistically modelled, the overlapping cinquefoil petals set with cushion-shaped and rose-cut diamonds, mounted in silver and gold circa 1860.[1]

  The date does give rise to the question as to whether this brooch was the one manufactured around the time of Queen Mary's wedding in 1893.

1. Christie's, p. 22

neck ornaments » TBF-QM-70 Queen Mary’s Five-Row Pearl Necklace » April 13, 2016 5:54 am

LauraM
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70. Queen Mary's Five-Row Pearl Necklace

   This five-row pearl necklace consisted of 520 pearls in total.[1]

   While the current whereabouts of this necklace is unknown, it is worth noting that Princess Margaret owned a magnificent natural five-row graduated pearl necklace, which was the gift of her grandmother, Queen Mary, to the Princess on her 18th birthday.[2]

   The necklace had a "...veri-cut [diamond] bombe plaque clasp, mounted in platinum, circa 1925..."[3] Queen Mary was noted for refashioning her jewels and so Princess Margaret's necklace may have been her grandmother's wedding gift.

   These pearls appeared in many of Princess Margaret's most iconic portraits "...from 1948 onwards, including her sittings for Baron and Cecil Beaton for her 19th, 20th and 21st birthdays."[4]

   This necklace was sold at Christie's on 13 June 2006 for £276,800. [5]

1. "The Royal Wedding: List of Princess May's Presents". The Aberdeen Journal, 27 Jun 1893, p. 10
2. Christie's. Property from the Collection of Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden. Volume I: Jewellery and Faberge, p. 150
2. Ibid.
4. Ibid.
5. Christie's: Sale 7335, Lot 118 An Art-Deco Pearl and Diamond Necklace http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/lot/an-art-deco-pearl-and-diamond-necklace-4718106-details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=4718106&sid=448bad2e-42c6-4f5c-9cf0-f9aac91396a2 [Accessed 12 April 2016]

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